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20120901
20120930
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
after protests in libya. joining me, david kirkpatrick of the "new york times" from cairo and david ignatius of the "washington post" from washington. >> i think one of the things that may have played a rolein his vulnerability is that ambassador stevens was something of a hero to the people of benghazi. he was stationed there throughout the conflict. he really provided eager and important support to the rebels who were trying to oust colonel moammar qaddafi when that fight was going on. he's somebody who's seen around town not necessarily with a heavy guard eating local food at local places, hanging out with local people. he's friends with a number of sheikhs, with many of the prominent local iellectuals. i think he had reason to believ the city of benghazi really had his back, that he was very welcome there. >> rose: continuing on the subject of libya, i talked earlier today by telephone from geneva with former secretary general of the united nations kofi annan. what should we worry about when you see the kinds of demonstrations we have seen in cairo and the more lethal consequenc
. last year, france played a key role rein libya. i am please to have laurent fabius back at this table. welcome back. >> it is the same table, although a different venue. looking at libya and looking at syria, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a legal authorization. and up to now, three times, russia and china say no. and, therefore, up to now, we hav
look at libya today, i mean, we were instrumental in getting rid of that regime. we were instrumental in getting rid of that regime in egypt. i think the much more important question is why do they hate each other so much? why do do so many people try to climb into power there against the other? that's reay the question we have to ask them. what my column today was about was how much sort of just hate speech you have in their media directed against shiites, directed against arab christians forget the jews, against sufis. this is not just about us at all. where does that come from? >> rose: has the arab spring lost its momentum? and is in the danger of being hijacked? >> you know, my view was always always this is going to take a long time and we're in-- we're not even at the end of the beginning. this is ju gng to-- this is a 50-year hole that's been dug in that part of the world. and... >> rose: modernity, women-- >> everything. and so it's quite and a half natural that the islamists were going to have the first crack at this because they were the most organized force. we saw in iraq
. the arab spring expresses a real soul in the arabic nations, starting from tunisia, libya, egypt and now syria. and syria will reach a stability very soon with the will of the syrian people, god willing. >> rose: let me talk about syria then i'll come back to egypt. what's necessary to stop the killing in syria? >> ( translated ): the international community needs to cooperate in order to achieve this goal and in order to achieve a real goal by the people of the free will to support the people of syria in their march towards freedom because the killing and the bloodshed, these are crimes that are being committed right now and the world is watching it and we see this and this is something that keeps us away from sleep. we need cooperation between us. we have a quartet between egypt and iran, saudi arabia and turkey and with the help of the united nations and the countries of the free world i believe that we are getting close to a solution very soon. god willing. >> rose: what would that quartet do? egypt, iran, saudi arabia, turkey. >> ( translated ): well, you're talking about the countr
in egypt and libya, tragically ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in benghazi, governor romney has attempted to make some political attacks out of the situation. and here is what he said. >> i think it's a-- a -- -- a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> rose: president obama responded in kind in a conversation with cbs news. >> governor romney seems to have a tendency to shoot first and name later. >> rose: the question is will this issue influence voters come november. more generally, how the nominees shaping up now that the conventions are out of the way. joining me from washington john dickerson, the political director of cbs news and a correspondent for "slate" magazine. and i am pleased to have him on this program. what do you make of this, john? >> well, it's funny, as you said, there has not been a lot of talk about foreign policy and it is the issue over which a president actually has a lot of control as president. the ecomy, the pside doesn't have that much control. what i make of it is governor romney wants to force play
look at libya, we had more opportunities to influence it, and we did. and we influenced it in a very positive way. and they like us more than a lot of people do in the middle east. but notwithstanding that, and the fact that libya died trying to protect him, we lost an ambassador this and other americans, because other people didn't. >> rose: take syria as an example, should we be doing more in syria? >> well, if the world we or at least we had some sort of alliance, i suppose you could try to have some sort of no-fly zone but the pilots would be very much in risk in that because of the capacity the syrians have on the ground to shoot down airplanes. so this is, syria is a really difficult proposition. and it's a complex to society. when mr. assad goes as i believe eventually he will, what takes its place. how do we do that? these are complicated things. i don'tknow enough about-- when every one of these things is going on, gi out of my way not to talk to hillary about it so i don't have any information i shouldn't have so i don't inadvertently say something to you that i shouldn't s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)